HILLMAN WEB TRIVIA ZINE
Volume 13
A Fun Site created by
Professor William Hillman culled from a daily motivational series
compiled for his BU Education Classes 2000-2009
The daily tech news items have been omitted since many of the stories are now "old news."
 

An eclectic collection of oddities, humorous anecdotes, weird photos, funny headlines, cartoons, puzzles, inspirational items, jokes, and more. . .  gathered here as a reference repository for speakers, lecturers, teachers, students, writers, or Web travellers just looking for diversion and a bit of levity. 
.

 
CONTENTS
WORD ODDITIES
Longest Words
Most Misspelled Words
Misspelled Queries in Google Search
Most Beautiful Words
Worst-Sounding Words
Words With ABC
Trademarks That Have Become Dictionary Words
Most Common Words
Reflective Words
Repetitions and Oddities
Homophones
Reduplications
Palindromes and Reversibles
Typewriter Words
Some Names That Became Words
Interjections
Oddities
Pangrams
.

Tarcoons & Jungle Funnies

Interstate 15 near Baker, California. This photo was taken in 1999 by Alvin Brattli.


The Latest Victim of the eColi Spinach Disaster
You knew it would happen eventually ....

WEB TREK
For Musicians: Fender® at Winter NAMM 2007: Demo of the VG Strat® on YouTube


LONGEST WORDS

Reference Site: Jeff Miller's Collection of Word Oddities and Trivia

SUPERCALIFRAGILISTICEXPIALIDOCIOUS (34 letters) from the movie Mary Poppins is not the longest word in English, although many people believe it is.

PNEUMONOULTRAMICROSCOPICSILICOVOLCANOCONIOSIS (45 letters; a lung disease caused by breathing in certain particles) is the longest word in any English-language dictionary. (It is also spelled -koniosis.)

SMILES is supposed to be the longest word in the dictionary because "there's a mile between the two S's."

According to Red Skelton, the longest word is the word that follows the announcement, "And now a word from our sponsor"!

LLANFAIRPWLLGWYNGYLLGOGERYCHWYRNDROBWLLLLANTYSILIOGOGOGOCH is according to one source the longest placename in the world, with 58 letters. It is a town in North Wales meaning "St. Mary's Church in the hollow of the white hazel near to the rapid whirlpool of Llantysilio of the red cave" or "St. Mary's (Church) by the white aspen over the whirlpool, and St. Tysilio's (Church) by the red cave" in Welsh.

A website at http://llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.co.uk/ has more information and claims the village is the longest name in Britain and that this address is the longest URL on the web.

HONORIFICABILITUDINITATIBUS is the longest word consisting entirely of alternating vowels and consonants.

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES is the longest name of a country consisting of alternating vowels and consonants.


MOST MISSPELLED WORDS
DUMBBELL, OCCURRENCE, MEMENTO, FRUSTUM, COLLECTIBLE, AMATEUR, DAIQUIRI, PASTIME, ACCIDENTALLY, PLAYWRIGHT, EMBARRASS, ACQUIT, HARASS, PRONUNCIATION, RECEIVE, A LOT, AMATEUR, SEPARATE, REALIZE, THEIR, DEFINITE, INDEPENDENT, WEIRD, EMBARRASS, ARGUMENT, NO ONE, ACQUIRE, ACCIDENTALLY, OCCURRENCE, COLLECTIBLE, RIDICULOUS, MANEUVER, LIAISON, GAUGE, ATHEIST, GRAMMAR, SUPERSEDE, KERNEL, CONSENSUS, IT'S/ITS, YOUR/YOU'RE, MINUSCULE, MILLENNIUM, EMBARRASSMENT, OCCURRENCE, ACCOMMODATE, PERSEVERANCE, SUPERSEDE, NOTICEABLE, HARASS, INOCULATE, OCCURRED, SEPARATE, EMBARRASS, PRECEDING, INDISPENSABLE, DEFINITELY, PRIVILEGE, GAUGE, QUESTIONNAIRE, EXISTENCE, MINIATURE, PRECEDE, WEIRD, RHYTHM, SEPARATELY, CONSCIENTIOUS, MISSPELL, HIERARCHY, GRAMMAR, CALENDAR, WITHHOLD, BARBECUE, UKULELE, and BICEPS


MISSPELLED QUERIES IN GOOGLE SEARCH
The Internet search engine Google revealed that in May 2001 its top five misspelled queries were amtrack, volkswagon, jenifer lopez, william sonoma, shakespear. In June 2001 its top five misspelled queries were ticket master, wimbeldon, morpheous, victoria secret, anna kornikova. In July 2001 its top five misspelled queries were audio galaxy, bigbrother, recipies, mcdonalds, bluebook. In August 2001 its top five misspelled queries were rotatorcuff, southpark, niagra falls, destinys child, sailormoon.


MOST BEAUTIFUL WORDS
ASPHODEL, FAWN, DAWN, CHALICE, ANEMONE, TRANQUIL, HUSH, GOLDEN, HALCYON, CAMELLIA, BOBOLINK, THRUSH, CHIMES, MURMURING, LULLABY, LUMINOUS, DAMASK, CERULEAN, MELODY, MARIGOLD, JONQUIL, ORIOLE, TENDRIL, MYRRH, MIGNONETTE, GOSSAMER, ALYSSEUM, MIST, OLEANDER, AMARYLLIS, ROSEMARY, CUSPIDOR, SYCAMORE


WORST-SOUNDING WORDS
Some of the worst-sounding words in English, according to a poll by the National Association of Teachers of Speech in August, 1946: CACOPHONY, CRUNCH, FLATULENT, GRIPE, JAZZ, PHLEGMATIC, PLUMP, PLUTOCRAT, SAP, TREACHERY, FRUCTIFY, KUMQUAT, QUAHOG, CREPUSCULAR, KAKKAK, GARGOYLE, CACOPHONOUS, AASVOGEL, BROBDINGNAGIAN, JUKEBOX, VICTUALS (pronounced "vittles")


WORDS WITH ABC

DABCHICK (a small bird) is among the very few words that contain ABC. Some others: ABCOULOMB, ABCHALAZAL, ABCAREE, CRABCAKE, DRABCLOTH, and ABCIXIMAB (a human-murine monoclonal antibody fragment that inhibits the aggregation of platelets) [Philip C. Bennett]. Allowing intervening punctuation, there is SAB-CAT (a saboteur) in W2 and W3 [Susan Thorpe in WordsWorth]. Proper nouns include BABCOCK, ABCOUDE (city in the Netherlands), and ZABCIKVILLE (city in Texas). There are also ABCHASICA, ABCHASICUM, and ABCHASICUS, all three of which are botanical names for Paeonia Plants found in the Caucasus


TRADEMARKS THAT HAVE BECOME DICTIONARY WORDS


ESCALATOR is one of many words that were originally trademarks but have become ordinary words found in dictionaries. Some other words which were originally trademarks (or still are) are AQUA-LUNG, ASPIRIN, AUTOHARP, BAKELITE, BAND-AID, BREATHALYZER, CELLOPHANE, CORNFLAKES, CUBE STEAK, DACRON, DEEPFREEZE, DICTAPHONE, DITTO, DRY ICE, DUMPSTER, FORMICA, FRISBEE, GRANOLA, GUNK, HEROIN, JEEP, JELL-O, KEROSENE, KLEENEX, LANOLIN, MACE, MIMEOGRAPH, MOXIE, NOVOCAIN, NYLON, PABLUM, PHILLIPS SCREW, PING-PONG, POPSICLE, Q-TIP, ROLLERBLADE, SCOTCH TAPE, SHEETROCK, STETSON HAT, STYROFOAM, TABLOID, TARMAC, TARZAN, THERMOS, TRAMPOLINE, VASELINE, VELCRO, WINDBREAKER, YO-YO, ZIPPER.



MOST COMMON WORDS

The most commonly used words in spoken English are I, YOU, THE, and A. 
The most commonly used words in written English, according to the 1971 American Heritage Word Frequency Book are: the, of, and, a, to, in, is, you, that, it, he, for, was, on, are, as, with, his, they at, be, this, from, I, have, or, by, one, had, not, but, what, all, were, when, we there, can, an, your, which, their, said, if, do.


REFLECTIVE WORDS
Some words with horizontal symmetry (they reflect themselves across a horizontal line) are: BEDECKED, CHECKBOOK, CHOICE, CODEBOOK, COOKBOOK, DECIDED, DIOXIDE, EXCEEDED, HIDE, ICEBOX,  OBOE.
Upper case BID is horizontally reflective while lower case bid is vertically reflective
SWIMS has 180-degree rotational symmetry.


REPETITIONS AND ODDITIES
INTESTINES has each of its letters occurring twice. Some other such words: ANTIPERSPIRANTES, APPEASES, ARRAIGNING, BERIBERI, CHOWCHOW, GENSENGS, HAPPENCHANCE, HORSESHOER, HOTSHOTS, REAPPEAR, SCINTILLESCENT, SIGNINGS, TEAMMATE
RESIGN has opposite meanings but is pronounced differently in each case ("to quit" and "to sign again").


TAXI is spelled the same way in nine languages: English, French, German, Swedish, Spanish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Portuguese, Hungarian, Romanian. 

THEREIN is a seven-letter word that contains thirteen words spelled with consecutive letters: the, he, her, er, here, I, there, ere, rein, re, in, therein, and herein.
THITHERWARDS contains 23: thitherward, thither, hi, hit, hithe, hither, hitherward, hitherwards, I, it, ither, the, he, her, er, wa, war, ward, wards, a, ar, ard and ards.
SHADES contains hades, shade; ades, hade, shad; des, ade, had, sha; es, de, ad, ha, and sh.

The word GOD appears exactly 4444 times in the King James version of the Bible.
The most commonly occurring name in the Bible is DAVID, which occurs 1,085 times.
The second most commonly occurring name is JESUS, which occurs 973 times.
The third most commonly occurring name is MOSES, which occurs 829 times.


HOMOPHONES
RAISE/RAZE are homophones with approximately opposite meanings. Others are  ECKLESS/WRECKLESS,

AURAL/ORAL, PETALLESS/PETALOUS.


REDUPLICATIONS

Achey Breakey, airy-fairy, angles 'n dangles (submarine maneuvers), antsy-pantsy, argy-bargy, artsy-fartsy, backpack, bedspread, bedstead, blackjack, blue flu, boogie-woogie, brain drain, chill pill, Chilly Willie (the cartoon penguin), Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (movie title), chrome dome, chug-a-lug, city kitty (CB jargon), county Mountie (CB jargon), Cox and Box (an operetta by Sir Arthur Sullivan), creepie-peepie (hand-held TV camera), Dennis the Menace, dilly-dally, Ditch Witch, double trouble, downtown, dream team, Euler's spoilers (the mathematicians who disproved Euler's conjecture about order 10 Latin squares), fancy-schmancy, fat cat, fender-bender, fine line, flower power, Flub-a-dub, frat rat, freight rate, Frito Bandito, fuddy-duddy, funny money, gaggin' wagon, gator freighter, gritz blitz, ground round, hanky-panky, harum-scarum, head shed (an army headquarters), heebie-jeebie(s), helter-skelter, hemidemisemiquaver, herky-jerky, hexaflexagon, higgledy piggledy, hipper-dipper (a baseball pitch), hobnob, hobson-jobson, hocus-pocus, hoity-toity, hokey-cokey, hokey-pokey, holy moly, honey-bunny, hootchie-kootchie, hotch-potch, hot shot, Hubble-bubble, hugger-mugger, Humpty Dumpty, hurdy-gurdy, hurly-burly, hurry-scurry, ill will, itsy-bitsy, jet set, legal beagle, legal eagle, local yokel, lovey-dovey, lunch bunch, mean machine, mellow yellow, middle fiddle, motor voter, Mr. Green Jeans, mud-blood, mumbo-jumbo, namby-pamby, near beer, night flight, night fright, night light, nitty-gritty, okey-dokey, Ollie's Trollies (restaurant chain), Pall Mall, pell-mell, phony baloney, Pick-Quick, picnic, piggly-wiggly, pooper-scooper, pop top, powwow, quick trick, ragin' Cajun, razzle-dazzle, red lead, repple-depple, Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, Rin-Tin-Tin, roach coach, rock 'em sock 'em, rock jock, roly-poly, roope-a-dope, rough tough cream puff, rub-a-dub, schlock rock, slick chick, slim Jim, snail mail, soap-on-a-rope, Spruce Goose, Steady Eddie (sung by Annette Funicello), Stormin' Norman, stun gun, sump pump, super-duper, sweetmeat, teeny-weeny, Tex-Mex, tie-dye, tooti-fruiti, town clown (CB jargon), Transistor Sister (sung by Neil Sedaka), virgin sturgeon, walkie-talkie, Watusi Luci (LBJ's daughter), white flight, white knight, willy-nilly, wingding. 
In 1934 Variety printed perhaps its most famous headline of all time, STIX NIX HICK PIX, meaning "rural communities reject movies about rural personae." On May 31, 2000, the New York Daily News wrote on page 1 HICKS NIX KNICKS TIX with the sub-headline "Pacers freeze New York fans out of courtside seats at Indy." The headline on page 5 read HICKS' KNICKS TIX TRICK.
French for walkie-talkie is talkie-walkie. 


PALINDROMES AND REVERSIBLES
SOS by ABBA was a hit recording with a palindromic title and artist. Palindromic album titles include Ole ELO by the Electric Light Orchestra, LIVE EVIL by Black Sabbath and by Miles Davis, EVIL LIVE by The Misfits, UFO TOFU by Bela Fleck and the Flecktones, AJA by Steely Dan, and AOXOMOXOA by the Grateful Dead. AHA is a Norwegian pop group. 
REVERSIBLE WORDS: When spelled backwards, they form other words are: 


AMAROID/DIORAMA, ANIMAL/LAMINA, DEIFIER/REIFIED, DELIVER/REVILED, DENIER/REINED, DENIES/SEINED, DENNIS/SINNED, DESSERT/TRESSED, DESSERTS/STRESSED, DIAPER/REPAID, DRAWER/REWARD, ECITON/NOTICE, ELIDES/SEDILE, ENAMOR/ROMANE, GATEMAN/NAMETAG, LEPER/REPEL, LIVED/DEVIL, LOOTER/RETOOL, MULLAHS/SHALLUM, PACER/RECAP, PARTS/STRAP, PILFER/REFLIP, PUPILS/SLIPUP, REDIPS/SPIDER, REDRAW/WARDER, REFLOW/WOLFER, REKNIT/TINKER, REKNITS/STINKER, RECAPS/SPACER,
REVOTES/SETOVER, SATRAPS/SPARTAS, SKUA/AUKS, SLEETS/STEELS, SLOOPS/SPOOLS, SNOOPS/SPOONS, SPORTS/STROPS, STRAW/WARTS


TYPEWRITER WORDS: longest words which can be typed using only the fingers of the left hand. 

AFTERCATARACTS (plural for a condition that sometimes follows cataract surgery), TESSERADECADES and TETRASTEARATES ~  ABSTRACTERS, ABSTRACTEST, AFTEREFFECT, AFTEREFFECTS,  AFTERTASTES, AFTERWARDS, ASSEVERATED, ASSEVERATES, BEGGARWEEDS, CASEBEARERS, CRABGRASSES, DATABASES, DECEREBRATE, DECEREBRATED, DECEREBRATES, DESECRATERS, DESEGREGATE, DESEGREGATED, DESEGREGATES, DEVERTEBRATED, EFFERVESCED, EFFERVESCES, EXTRAVASATES, GAZETTEER, READDRESSED, READDRESSES, REAGGRAVATES, REASSEVERATE, RESEGREGATE, RESEGREGATED, RESEGREGATES, REVEGETATED, REVEGETATES, REVERBERATE, REVERBERATED, REVERBERATES, SASSAFRASES, STAGECRAFTS, STATECRAFTS, STAVESACRES, STEWARDESSES, SWEATERDRESSES, SWEETBREADS, TERRACEWARDS, TRADECRAFTS, VERTEBRATES, WASTEWATERS, WATERCRAFTS, WATERCRESSES.


TYPEWRITER WORDS: longest words typing with the right hand
JOHNNY-JUMP-UP (a fast-growing flower or a brand name for a type of toy) HOKYPOKY, HOMONYMY, HOMOPHONY, HOMOPHYLY, HYPOLIMNION, HYPOPHYLL, HYPOPHYLLIUM, HYPOPHYLLUM, HYPOPYON, ILLINIUM, ILLUMINOPOLY, KINNIKINNIK, LOLLIPOP, LUPULINUM, MILLIMHO, MILLIOHM, MIMINYPIMINY, MINIKINLY, MINIMILL, MONOHULL, MONOPHONY, MONOPOLY, NIPPONIUM, NONILLION, PHYLLOPHYLLIN, POLLINIUM, POLONIUM, POLYONOMY, POLYPHONIUM, POLYPHONY, UNHOLILY.

A sentenced typed using only the right hand: In July, oh my kill-joy Molly, Iíll look in upon my jumpy polo pony up in hilly Honolulu.


SOME NAMES THAT BECAME WORDS

BLOOMER: Amanda Bloomer or Amelia Jenkins Bloomer (1818-1894), American feminist
BOBBY: Sir Robert Peel (1788-1850), founder of London police force
BOWIE KNIFE James Bowie (1796-1836), American pioneer
BOYCOTT: Charles C. Boycott (1832-1897), English land agent
BOYSENBERRY: Rudolph Boysen, American botanist
BUNSEN BURNER: Robert Wilhelm Bunsen (1811-99), German chemist
CAESAREAN SECTION: Gaius Julius Caesar, who according to legend was born in this manner
CARDIGAN: James Thomas Brudnell, 7th Earl of Cardigan (1797-1868), British cavalry officer
CASANOVA: Giovanni Jacopo Casanova de Seingalt (1725-98), Italian adventurer
CRAPPER: widely believed to have come from the name of a Thomas Crapper.
            However, the word apparently derives from the word crap, which is found in middle English.
DECIBEL: Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922)
DERBY: Edward Stanley, 12th earl of Derby, founded the race, 1870
DIESEL: Rudolf Diesel (1858-1913), German automotive designer
FERRIS WHEEL: George Washington Gale Ferris (1859-96), American engineer
FRISBEE: William Russell Frisbie, pie shop owner in Bridgeport CT
GATLING GUN: Richard J. Gatling (1818-1903), American inventor
GROG: Old Grog, nickname of Sir Edward Vernon (1684-1757), British admiral
GUPPY: Robert J. L. Guppy (1836-1916), British scientist from Trinidad
KNICKERBOCKERS: Dietrich Knickerbocker, pseudonym of Washington Irving (1783-1859)
LEOTARD: Jules Léotard (1839-70), French acrobat
LEVIS: Levi Strauss (1830-1902), Bavarian immigrant to the USA and clothing merchant
LUDDITE: Ned Ludd, 18th cent. Leicestershire workman who destroyed machinery
LYNCH: Capt. William Lynch (1742-1820), plantation owner in Virginia
MAVERICK: Samuel Augustus Maverick (1803-1870), Texas cattle owner
MORSE CODE: Samuel Finley Breese Morse (1791-1872), American artist and inventor
NAMBY-PAMBY: Nickname of Ambrose Philips (1674-1749), English poet
NICOTINE: Jean Nicot (c. 1530 - 1600), French ambassador to Portugal
OSCAR: Oscar Pierce, American wheat and fruit grower and uncle of an Academy executive director
PASTEURIZE: Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), French chemist
RITZY: César Ritz (1850-1918), Swiss hotelier
SADISM: Count Donatien Alphonse François de Sade (1740-1814), French soldier and novelist
SALISBURY STEAK: James J. Salisbury, 19th century English physician
SALMONELLA: Daniel Elmer Salmon (1850-1914), American veterinarian
 SANDWICH: John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich (1718-92), English diplomat
 SANFORIZED: Sandford Lockwood Cluett (b. 1840), American inventor
 SAXOPHONE: Antoine-Joseph Sax, also known as Adolphe Sax (1814-1894), Belgian inventor
 SEQUOIA: Sequoya (c. 1770-1843), Cherokee Indian who invented the Cherokee syllabary
 SHRAPNEL: Henry Shrapnel (1761-1842), British army officer
SIDEBURNS: Gen. Ambrose Everett Burnside (1824-1881), Union soldier
 SILHOUETTE: Etienne de Silhouette (1709-1767), French minister of finance in 1759
 SPOONERISM: Rev. William Archibald Spooner (1844-1930), of New College, Oxford
 SOUSAPHONE: John Phillip Sousa (1854-1932), American composer and bandleader
 STETSON: John Bauerson Stetson (1830-1906), American hat-maker
 TARMAC: John Loudon McAdam (1756-1836), Scottish engineer (the word is short for "tarmacadam")
TEDDY BEAR: Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919), U. S. president
THESPIAN: Thespis, 6th century B. C. Greek poet
TOMMY GUN: Gen. John Taliaferro Thompson (1860-1940), U. S. soldier
ZEPPELIN: Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin (1838-1917), German general and aeronautical pioneer 
Some words named for legendary figures and characters in literature are: ammonia, Atlas, Bacchanalia, blimp, braggadocio, cereal, chauvinism, diddle, fauna, flora, Friday, gamp, gargantuan, golliwog, hector, hermaphrodite, hermetic, hyacinth, iris, January, juggernaut, June, March, May, mentor, morphone, narcissism, nemesis, palladium, panic, pants, Saturday, stentorian, tantalize, Thursday, Tuesday, volcano, vulcanize, Wednesday, Wendy house.



INTERJECTIONS

adios, ah, aha, ahem, ahoy, alack, alas, all hail, alleluia, aloha, amen, attaboy, auf wiedersehen, aw, ay, bah, begorra, bejesus also bejeezus, bingo, bleep, boo, by or bye, bye-bye or by-by, cheerio, cheers, ciao, crikey or crickey, cripes, dear, egad or egads, eh, eureka, faugh, fie, fore, gad, gadzooks, gar, gardyloo, gee, gee whiz, gesundheit, glory or glory be, golly, gosh, gramercy, ha, ha-ha, hail, hallelujah, haw, heads up, heigh-ho, hem, hep, hey, hey presto, heyday, hi, hip, hist, ho, ho hum, hollo also holloa or holla, hoot or hoots, hosanna also hosannah, hot dog, howdy, hoy, huh, humph, hup, hurrah also hurray, hut, jeepers also jeepers creepers, jeez, jingo, la, lackaday, lo, lo and behold, lordy, marry, my word, od or odd, oh, ooh, oops, ouch, ow, pardie or pardi or pardy, phew, phooey, pip-pip, pish, poof, pooh, prithee, prosit or prost, pshaw, quotha, rah, rats, righto, roger, selah, sh, shalom, shalom aleichem, shoo, shoot, so long, touche, tush, tut, tut-tut, ugh, uh-huh, uh-oh, uh-uh, view halloo, viva, voila, waesucks, wahoo, welcome, well, wellaway, whee, whoopee, why, wilco, wirra, wisha, woe, wow, yech or yecch, yikes, yippee, yo, yoicks, yoo-hoo, yuck also yuk, yum-yum, zap, zooks, zounds, zowie.

More words that are often used interjectionally: adieu, au revoir ball, bam, bang, bon voyage, bosh, bother, botheration, boy, brava, bravo, come on, f***, fudge, go to, good-by, goodness, hard cheese, hard lines, hello, here, huzza, indeed, Jove, know, like, man, mean, my, nerts, no sweat, peace, period, rather, right on, rot, shuck, silence, skoal, so, son of a b****, son of a gun, there, timber, truly, whatever, whew, whisht, whist, whoop, whoosh.

PUN GROANER
An art thief in Paris planned to steal some paintings from the Louvre. After careful planning, he got past security, stole the paintings, and made it safely to his van. He was, however, captured only two blocks away when his van ran out of gas. 

When asked how he could have masterminded such a crime, yet make such a careless error in not having enough gas to make his getaway, he replied, 

"Monsieur, that is the reason I stole the paintings. 
I had no Monet to buy Degas to make the Van Gogh." 

And you thought I didn't have deGaulle to pass this along. Well, I have nothing Toulouse.

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