Bill and Sue-On Hillman: A 50-Year Musical Odyssey
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HILLMAN INDOCHINA ADVENTURE
PART 2

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PAGE 1: MEKONG ADVENTURE I
Outtakes 1
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Running 4,345 km from its headwaters in the Tibetan Plateau to the South China Sea, the Mekong River feeds Southeast Asia with its abundant fish population, irrigates the surrounding lands, draws borders and, as all great rivers do, builds civilizations. The banks carry stories of both ancient and modern life, and the people who live along its shores still rely on the Mekong for their livelihood.

Artifacts found in Ban Chiang, Thailand, show the river region was occupied as early as 210 BC. Archeologists in Oc Eo, in An Giang, Vietnam, found evidence of Roman trade. And the great Khmer Empire established Angkor Wat, their magnificent temple complex, in the Mekong Delta. 

The riverís biodiversity is second only to that of the Amazon. New species are still being discovered. The river is home to giant catfish, stingrays and a freshwater soft-shell turtle that grows to weigh more than 500 pounds. Itís also home to the critically endangered Irrawaddy dolphin, a creature that some researchers say can distinguish between local dialects.

Outsider exploration of the river was stymied by difficult terrain ó the river is broken with difficult rapids and waterfalls. The headwaters werenít identified by Western sources until 1900.

Vietnam, Cambodia and Thailand all have large shipping ports on the river, and increasingly, bridges for both rail and road traffic span border crossings and move vast amounts of cargo between nations and abroad.

Now, Mekong politics centre around hydroelectric power and the impact that upstream dams have on fish populations that sustain communities throughout the entire region. As awareness of the riverís rich ecosystem increases, thereís growing interest in sustaining both the ecological and archeological assets not just for tourists, but for everyone in the region who depends on the river for food, transportation and much, much more. 


 

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Copyright 2015
Bill and Sue-On Hillman
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