HILLMAN STEREOVIEW GALLERIES
CANADA (Here)  ::  CHINA 1  ::  CHINA 2  ::  INDIA
PART I
The Hillman Stereoview Archive
3-D Images of Canada's Early Years
A CROSS-CANADA TOUR
www.hillmanweb.com/3d
..
EARLY CANADIAN
INTRO & NAVIGATION MAP
STEREOVIEWS
Maritimes
Quebec | Quebec2 | Quebec3
Montreal | Montreal II
Ontario
Niagara Falls
Toronto
Ottawa
Prairies
Alberta Rockies
BC Coast & Mountains
Manitoba
North & Labrador
.
Wildlife
.
Native Indian I
Native Indian II
Native Indian III
Native Indian IV
Native Indian V
Native Indian VI
Native Indian VII
Inuit
US Apaches
.

PART II
CHINA IN 3D: GALLERIES 1-60
www.hillmanweb.com/3d/china3d


CONTENTS
CLICK FOR FULL-SIZE IMAGE OF THE ABOVE COLLAGE
Ancient China In Three Dimension :: Stereoview Cards 1860-1910

CHINA 1

CHINA 2

CHINA 3

CHINA 4

CHINA 5

CHINA 6

CHINA 7

CHINA 8

CHINA 9

CHINA 10

CHINA 11

CHINA 12

CHINA 13

CHINA 14

CHINA 15

CHINA 16

CHINA 17

CHINA 18

CHINA 19

CHINA 20

CHINA 21

China 22

China 23

China 24

China 25

China 26

China 27

China 28

China 29

China 30

China 31

China 32

China 33

China 34

China 35

China 36

China 37

China 38
.
China 39
.
China 40
.
China 41
..
China 42

China 43

China 44

China 45

China 46
..
China 47

China 48

China 49

China 50

China 51

China 52

China 53

China 54

China 55

China 56

China 57

China 58

China 59

China 60
..

HONG KONG I

HONG KONG II

HONG KONG III
.

SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE II

MALAYSIA
.

SIAM :: THAILAND
.


PART III
CHINA 3D GALLERIES 61+
ENTER
www.hillmanweb.com/3da


Click for Collage


PART IV
INDIA IN 3D
ENTER
www.hillmanweb.com/3dindia


Click for Collage

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Viewing In 3-D On A Computer Monitor

To view most computer stereo images, you need to look at the left-hand image with your right eye, and at the right-hand image with your left eye (called convergent or cross-eye viewing). Gaze at the stereo pair, keeping your eyes level and cross your eyes slightly. Try to cross your eyes slowly, so that the two images in the centre come together. When they converge or fuse, you will see them as a single 3-D image. The centre image is three-dimensional. 

Another approach. With your head level and about 2.5 feet from the screen, hold up a finger, with its tip about 6 inches in front of your face, and centered between the stereo pair on the screen. Focus on your finger tip. Without focusing on the screen, notice how many images you see there (they will be blurred). If you see four images, move your finger slowly toward or away from you eyes, keeping focused on your finger tip, until the middle pair of images converge. With your finger still in place, partly covering the converged pair, change your focus to the screen. The image partly hidden by your finger should appear three-dimensional. Your finger should still appear single, but blurred. With some practice, you can remove your finger and still keep the screen images converged into a stereo image.

Another approach is to stick a piece of cardboard down the middle and put your nose to the cardboard. You’ll have to work out the proper distance from the screen but you should be able to trick your eyes into the stereo effect. 

Perhaps the best way is to adapt a vintage 3-D viewer for viewing the screen images.

Travelling by the Underwood Travel System -- Stereographs, Guide Books, Patent Map System
Travelling by the Underwood Travel System -- Stereographs, Guide Books, Patent Map System

WARTIME
The Great War 1914-1918

Part 1: The Ground War
Part 2: The Air War

Chicago World's Fair 1893: Columbian Exposition
Part of the Edgar Rice Burroughs Connections Series

Stereo Intro & Chicago
White City Buildings
Fair Exhibits I
Fair Exhibits II
Midway Adventure
Victorian Peep Show
Ed's Tour I
Ed's Tour II
Ed's Tour III
ERB LibrarySouvenirs
VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS I
3-D Stereocards from the past
VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS II
3-D Stereocards from the past
VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS III
3-D Stereocards from the past
VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS IV
3-D Stereocards from the past
VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS V
3-D Stereocards from the past
VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS VI
3-D Stereocards from the past
.
50 StereoView Cards of the Sears, Roebuck, Co. ~ circa 1906
From the Edgar Rice Burroughs Personal Library
The Danton Burroughs Family Archive
Sears Cards 1-10
Sears Cards 11-20
Sears Cards 21-30
Sears Cards 31-40
Sears Cards 41-50
STEREOGRAPHIC PHOTOGRAPHY
STEREOVIEWS ~ STEREOGRAMS ~ STEREOSCOPES
 
A stereogram or stereoview is a flat two-dimensional image viewed in such a fashion as to produce a three-dimensional effect..Stereographic photography was invented almost immediately after photography itself. During the Victorian era photographers were sent out to photograph the world in 3D, and the photographs were reproduced over and over to meet the demand -- manufacturing and assembling the views was big business. .Looking at stereographs was as common in Victorian times as watching TV is today. People would relax in their parlor and be transported around the country and around the world with a box full of stereos and a hand-held or tabletop viewer.
Stereo pictures are taken by means of a camera with two lenses. This provides two separate pictures 2.5 inches apart, about the distance between the eyes. Although the pictures appear the same, they are not. When looked at in a viewer, which has prismatic lenses, your eyes will blend the two views into one and the brain perceives it in three dimensions the same as normal vision. It's estimated that over 7 million different images were commercially produced, and these had runs anywhere from a handful to thousands! The demise of the stereoscope began with the advent of other forms of entertainment media and by the 1940s, about the only type of stereoviewing available was the View Master.
Manufacturing Stereograms
Manufacturing Stereocards
.
.

The Auto-Stereoscope

These state-of-the-art 1893 "Drop Card" machines display a series of stereoview cards. 
The two side-by-side pictures on each card give a spectacular illusion of three dimensions. 

The internal mechanism of the machines features a patented spring-driven clockwork drive which switches on an electrical lighting bulb and sequentially displays the stereoview cards. 

The wooden cabinets are of ornate and well-constructed design.

.
THE MUTOSCOPE
"The most exciting entertainment invention of the century!"

The Mutoscope -- manufactured by the American Mutoscope and Biograph Companies -- worked on the same principle as a "flip-book." The individual image frames were conventional black-and-white, silver-based photographic prints on tough, flexible opaque cards. Rather than being bound into a booklet, the cards were attached to a circular reel. The reel held about 850 cards, giving a viewing time of about a full minute. The reel with cards attached had a total diameter of about ten inches. 

Some Mutoscopes were coin-operated. The patron viewed the cards through a pair of lenses enclosed by a hood, similar to the viewing hood of a regular stereoscope. The cards were lit electrically, but the reel was driven by means of a geared-down hand crank.

Each machine held single reel and was dedicated to the presentation of a single short subject, described by a poster affixed to the machine. The patron controled the presentation speed but the crank could be turned only in one direction, preventing the patron from reversing and repeating part of the reel. The patron was advised that stopping the crank or slowing it too much would throw the images far enough out of focus to blur them beyond recognition. 


From pinktentacle.com
Geishas Viewing Stereoview Cards

TO THE MANITOBA PHOTO ARCHIVE

Part of the Hillman EduTech Research Project at Brandon University
 

BACK TO HILLMAN MAIN SITE CONTENTS
All Original Work and Photo Restoration ©1996/2016
William Hillman
Faculty of Education Professor (Retired)
Brandon University